Posts Tagged ‘Jellyfish Princess’

Last week I posted about my wedding to Kane. My wedding dress was made by my Mother. She is supremely talented and has always made the most beautiful dresses for me. I still have some of my childhood dresses that were made by her hands. While I was recovering from pneumonia, my husband and I were devouring anime. We found Jellyfish Princess and I blew through the whole series in two and a half days. The show touched me. It made me think about my Mom and how much I love her. I don’t know what I would do without her in my life. I had to share this anime with her because I felt that it would speak to her on the same level it spoke to me.

So, I talked to her about Jellyfish Princess. I probably talked about it non-stop for a month. I also probably talked about it way more than I should have. Then I rewatched, several times. So what’s it about? (Warning: some spoilers ahead)

Tsukimi loves Jellyfish. She went to school for art but hasn’t found a job. Living in Tokyo, she moved into an all women’s building that is called Amamizukan. She spends her days hanging out with her friends and drawing jellyfish. They call the building the nunnary as a joke because all the residents are unmarried women, mostly in their 30’s. Tsukimi is the youngest, she’s only 18. One night on her way home, Tsukimi makes an unusual friend, Kuranosuke, who is one of the “stylish”. Everyone at Amamizukan are female Otaku and Fujoshi. They have their hobbies and they all work for Juon Mejiro, who is a yaoi manga artist that lives there with them. Kuranosuke helps Tsukimi save a spotted jellyfish from a local fish store when it’s put in a tank with a jellyfish that will kill it. After that, Kuranosuke keeps coming around, even after Tsukimi finds out Kuranosuke is actually a guy. Befriending Tsukimi, even against her wishes, he finds out that Amamizukan is being threatened with redevelopement and hatches a wild scheme. They are going to make jellyfish dresses and sell them! The money will be enough to buy the building and save it from being torn down. In the mean time, he’s also trying to help them all learn a few things about being stylish.

Tsukimi is always thinking about her Mother. She misses her so much because she died when she was a little girl. Her Mother used to take her to the aquarium and they would watch the jellyfish. Her Mother would say, when you are all grown up, I’ll make you a wedding dress that looks like a jellyfish. She also told her that every little girl grows up to be a princess. It’s sad, sweet and hits me right in the feels. Kuranosuke can relate because his Mother is not allowed to have contact with him. He happens to be the illigitamate son of a politician. He misses his Mother and her dresses. (/spoilers)

The anime and manga are written and drawn by Akiko Higashimura. She based the comic off her own office. The Amars, as they call themselves, being her single unwed assistants. The Manga artist is based on herself. The manga is a little different than the anime, but the heart of the story really comes through. The focus is on taking Tsukimi, learning to trust in her abilities and relying on her friend. Also, Kuranosuke wants to show her that everyone can be a princess. That is the same in both the manga and the anime.

Why did I share this with my Mom? I thought we could really bond over this anime. She made my dress, which sort of looks like a jellyfish. She loves fashion, I love Japanese fashion. Secretly, my Mother loves cartoons too.

We’re still working our way through the series together. We get together and watch an episode at a time. She can’t do marathon’s like Kane and I. That’s all  I care about though, spending time with her and relating on common levels. Even though she doesn’t understand some of the references, like one of the characters is obsessed with the Three Kingdoms, she gets most of the context. While we were watching the show, she actually mentioned how much the main character reminded her of myself.  Part of me already thought that and wanted her to watch it because I could see the comparison.

If you are looking for a short series, there are only 11 episodes take time on netflix to watch, Jellyfish Princess.

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